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Collaborators

Dr. Makoto Hashimoto

I am currently an Associate Staff Scientist at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource. I joined the Shen group as a postdoctoral scholar in 2008, after receiving my Ph.D at the University of Tokyo, Japan. My current research interest is to understand strongly-correlated electron systems, particularly high-temperature cuprate superconductors by mainly using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). I am also interested in the use and development of other spectroscopy techniques such as resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS), time-resolved ARPES and spin-resolved ARPES.
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Dr. Patrick Kirchmann

The emergence of order in complex quantum materials is governed by competing interactions of charge, lattice and spin degrees of freedom, which, however, often are difficult to disentangle in thermal equilibrium. Thus I am interested in applying non-equilibrium femtosecond pump-probe schemes and in particular time-resolved ARPES and time-resolved soft x-ray diffraction to such materials as CDW-BCS cross-over compounds, novel superconductors and topological insulators. These methods offer new insights to the underlying fundamental scattering processes and may open novel possibilities for device application.
[Email | CV]


Dr. Wei-Sheng Lee

I am interested in learning the underlying physics of strongly correlated materials through spectroscopic tools, which normally reveal lots of microscopic information of the electronic states. As an extension of my Ph.D. thesis work, I continue to explore the physics of high-Tc cuprates using the ultra-high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). The much improved resolution not only could lead to new discoveries, but also make possible a more quantitative analysis of the ARPES data. The other very exciting project I am working on is to explore the possibility of using the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) to do optical pump and x-ray probe experiments. New insight could be revealed via studying how the electronic state relaxes from an excited state back to the ground state.
[Email | CV]


Dr. Donghui Lu

I am currently a staff scientist at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. I graduated from Nanjing University with B.S. degree in Solid State Physics. I spent three years in Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China and three years in Institute of Solid State Physics, Karlsruhe Research Center, Germany for my post-graduate studies. I received my Ph.D. degree in Condensed Matter Physics in 1997. My research interests are mainly focused on ARPES studies of strongly correlated electron systems.
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Dr. Sung-Kwan Mo

I am a research scientist at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. I received my Ph.D. from University of Michigan in 2006, then worked as a postdoctoral fellow in Shen group before moving across the Bay in 2010. My scientific interest is to investigate electronic properties of advanced materials using ARPES, ranging from heavy fermions, topological insulators, low dimensional systems, to functional oxides for energy applications.
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Dr. Rob Moore

My focus in experimental condensed matter physics involves understanding the surface properties of correlated electron systems. With properties as superconductivity, colossal magnetoresistance, ferroelectricity, and enhanced catalytic reactions, the immense potential from both academic and technological points of view are evident. The surfaces of such systems offer a unique opportunity to not only investigate the intricate coupling degrees of freedom responsible for such exotic phases but an opportunity to search for new phases. The strive for nanoscale applications, where surface properties dominate, emphasizes the importance of interfaces and reduced dimensionality.
[Email | CV]

I joined the Shen group in September 2006. My focus in experimental condensed matter physics involves understanding the surface properties of correlated electron systems. With properties as superconductivity, colossal magnetoresistance, ferroelectricity, and enhanced catalytic reactions, the immense potential from both academic and technological points of view are evident. The surfaces of such systems offer a unique opportunity to not only investigate the intricate coupling degrees of freedom responsible for such exotic phases but an opportunity to search for new phases. The strive for nanoscale applications, where surface properties dominate, emphasizes the importance of interfaces and reduced dimensionality.

My Ph.D. work at the University of Tennessee involved bulk and surface investigations of Transition Metal Oxides utilizing a variety of techniques. My work included bulk phonon measurements employing inelastic neutron scattering, surface phonon measurements and other quasi-particle excitations utilizing High Resolution Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (HREELS), surface structural determination by quantitative Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED-IV), and investigations of surface structure and electronic properties by Scanning Probe Microscopy including Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy (STS). My M.S. work at the University of Washington involved studying the microscopic magnetic return point memory of Co/Pt multilayered thin films by coherent soft x-ray speckle metrology.

I enjoy not only unraveling material properties but advancing experimental techniques to fully capture the underlying physics necessary to design materials with the properties we desire. My intentions are to expand my horizons into the world of electronic structure with ARPES.

Outside of physics, I also enjoy hiking, motorcycle riding and playing Go (Weiqi).


Shujie Tang

I am currently a joint Ph.D. Candidate between Stanford University and Chinese Academy of Science. My research focused on graphene growth on hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. A new method of boosting graphene growth utilizing gaseous catalyst was investigated. Largest graphene growth rate and graphene single crystal domain on dielectric were obtained by this method. Based on the unique microwave impedance microscopy (MIM) and the work I did, my current research focus on the characterization of graphene grain boundaries and defects by using MIM.
[Email]